Environment
Understanding the Blue Systems | Maithily Velangi
LA 54
A city that possesses no permanent water bodies of its own, Bengaluru has seen the development of an ingenious method for the creation of its own manmade lakes (tanks). These tanks proved pivotal in sustaining the many settlements and agricultural fields in the vicinity. However, people's changing attitudes towards these tanks, stemming from ignorance shortage of proper resources has rendered them almost obsolete. The city needs to sensitize the people to the needs of these tanks and put measures into place to ensure the future of these tanks, and in turn the city's, is secured.
Inception and evolution of the tanks

Bengaluru is situated on the Deccan Plateau in a semi-arid region at an average elevation of 900m above sea level. The written records show that early permanent settlements that happened in Bengaluru, at the beginning of the Common Era, were towards the east, in what we today identify as the inner-city core. The landscape was then supplied by monsoon fed, dendritic streams that fed into the Arakavati River, a tributary of Cauvery.

Though Bengaluru is not located near any permanent source of water like a river or a large water body, the settlements grew because of other favourable conditions that were suitable for agriculture. Taking advantage of the natural drainage patterns, the low-lying areas were used to hold water, and were later constructed with bunds towards the downstream flow to create reservoirs or tanks.

The construction of any new tank marked the start of new settlement along with agricultural fields in the surrounding areas based on the water-capacity of the tank.



 
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