LA 64 |
EDITORIAL

Has technology empowered us to have a more informed and evolved understanding of our sites, their processes and subsequently our designs? This is not an easy question to answer. Most of us are still geared to think by hand, drawing sketches, doodling, analyzing and while imagining various future scenarios and contexts.

At the same time, technology has surely opened new ways of observing complex realities and imagining new ideas. As Manali Nanavati observes in her article on documenting vernacular architecture, photography, ideography and laser techniques have made the process of gathering interdisciplinary information much easier and faster. At the same time, the technical skills, at times, are so overwhelming that they block our natural ability to imagine which is nurtured by inherent traits of human mind. It is important to remember that technology is the skill to interpret our own thinking, imagination and knowledge into appropriate graphical and verbal formats. It is not the knowledge itself. Marc Treib, eminent academician observes that the students proficient at drawing by hand get more interesting and sophisticated results from the computer as they impose their will on the machine instead of being a slave to its default settings. In a special feature, he shares his views about the subject along with other interesting experiences.

In another article, Frieddie Riberio, landscape architect observes that the flexibility in hand drawing often reflects the personality of the individual drawing it. Premola Ghose’s hand drawn sketches and illustrations of cityscapes paints a humane side of a city, with people, nature and animals, a work of a sensitive mind. Ankon Mitra’s creations in Origami, in his views, “wander in the three worlds of Geometry, Landscape and Material and meet to create a vision of an interconnected whole.” In a special feature, he shares few of his works along with the nature imagery that has inspired them.

Adyar Poonga is one of the examples of nature conservation that has amalgamated the use and expertise of science, design and art to create a public space that addresses the urban needs of a metropolitan city. It offers many lessons to address similar contexts in our cities, which are grappling with serious environmental issues.

Any calamity, natural or manmade, makes us reflect on the knowledge and learning of many of past research and studies. Ayla Khan reviews The Silent Spring, the classic book about the seminal discourse on environmental pollution, written about six decades ago, that gave rise to powerful global environmental movement around the globe. The knowledge of the book, especially in times of Pandemic is thought provoking.

LA Journal will be produced in a digital format for the next full year, in 2021, till the time the country recovers substantially from COVID-19 pandemic. As ever, we look forward to your support and wishes.

Wishing you all a healthy and positive times in the new year. Stay safe.


THE AESTHETICS OF PLANTINGS IN EARLY MUGHAL GARDEN PAINTINGS III: POETICS OF PLANTING
James L. Wescoat Jr.
 

AN ECOLOGICAL MASTER PLAN FOR ADYAR POONGA CREEK & ESTUARY
Idea Design


RE-IMAGINING ROLES
Samir Mathur
 

DOING MORE WITH LESS
In conversation with Marc Treib


DOCUMENTING VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE:
AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH TO ARCHITECTURE

Manalee Nanavati
 

ART AS A LANDSCAPE OF FOLDS
Ankon Mitra
 


tribute |

REMEMBERING KULDIP
Ram Sharma


heritage, local traditions and crafts |

THE AESTHETICS OF PLANTINGS IN EARLY MUGHAL GARDEN PAINTINGS III: POETICS OF PLANTING
James L. Wescoat Jr.


THE ‘NATURE’ OF ART: TRACING THE HISTORY OF MODERN PAINTINGS IN ASSAM
Anjali Chandawarkar

THE MYSTICISM OF THE HIMALAYAS
WATER TREASURES OF THE HIMALAYAS
Review by Divya Chopra


environment, ecology and biodiversity |

AN ECOLOGICAL MASTER PLAN FOR ADYAR POONGA CREEK & ESTUARY
Idea Design

WHAT THE EYES DON'T SEE
SILENT SPRING
Review by Ayla Khan


design, conservation and planning |

RE-IMAGINING ROLES
Samir Mathur


VIEW FROM WITHIN
MAKING A MARK
Geeta Wahi Dua


city and culture |

DOING MORE WITH LESS
In conversation with Marc Treib


DOCUMENTING VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE
AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH TO ARCHITECTURE
Manalee Nanavati


THE PENCIL AND THE MOUSE
Freddie Ribeiro


IN WONDERLAND!
Aruna Ghose


seeing the unseen |

ART AS A LANDSCAPE OF FOLDS
Ankon Mitra
















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